Heritage Behavioral Health Consultants
Heritage Behavioral Health Consultants

TAAS and TAKS and STAAR
......OH MY!

By Jill Early, M.Ed., LPC Intern

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For many young students in Texas these three familiar acronyms represent something much scarier than lions and tigers and bears.

STANDARDIZED TESTING, as we know it today, often leaves students and teachers feeling caught in the tornado nightmare Dorothy experienced in the Wizard of Oz. Everyone wants to go home.

The cheerful buzz of spring and the excitement of summer peeking around the corner have become overshadowed by the emphasis placed on standardized testing. The STAAR (State of Texas Assessment of Academic Readiness), which replaces the former TAKS test, has promised an increased level of rigor and greater depth of cognitive complexity.

Students and teachers all over Texas are feeling the heat to perform. An increased number of children, as young as third grade, are presenting signs of test anxiety. How does one differentiate between normal levels of nervous energy and increased levels of anxiety that can significantly impact performance? If you notice any of the following symptoms in your child, he or she may be struggling with test anxiety.

  • Physiological: changes in eating patterns, upset stomach, nausea, headaches, increased heart rate, or muscle tension
  • Emotional: changes in mood, such as sadness, anger, frustration, or nervousness; fatigue, cries often, feels helpless, fears failure
  • Cognitive: irrational, negative self-statements (“I don’t get it. I know I will fail.”), reduced self-esteem, difficulty concentrating, negative thoughts about performance

What can parents do to help?

  • Encourage children to replace negative self-talk with positive statements. (From: “Math is my worst subject. I am not going to pass this test.” With: “I have studied hard and will do the best I can on this test.”)
  • Practice relaxation. Encourage children to take long, deep breaths before and during the test.
  • Develop a plan for taking breaks during the test.
  • Provide opportunities for physical exercise at home before test day and encourage stretching during the test.
  • Guide children in developing good study skills and a quiet environment to work in at home.
  • Speak with teachers and school counselors to offer support in the classroom and on test day.
  • And of course, don’t forget the basics; make sure children are well rested and properly nourished on test day.

If your child is struggling with anxiety this testing season, please don’t hesitate to contact one of the counselors at HBHC. We are happy to assist in developing strategies to decrease test anxiety so that your child can step into any testing situation in a calm and confident manner.

Contact Information

1325 Campbell Rd
Houston TX 77055
Phone: 713-365-9015
Fax: 713-365-0632